The do’s and don’ts of an expedition!

When about to embark on our trip we had a panic as to what we would and would not need. However on the look for a blog that would help us any we were unsuccessful.

Hence the reasoning for this came along, so ladies and gentlemen, prepare as you are about to embark on a path of my wisdom.

 

What to do:

 

  • When working out money and budgets a calculator may come in handy, because despite has some smarty pants maths ‘wiz kids’, heat and fatigue generally fog up your brain.
  • Due to the limited amount of clothing and the constant walking and working, rips etc tend to happen and so a little sewing kit can always come in handy.
  • Sponges get minging. TAKE PLENTY!!! You are trying to make your dishes clean….
  • A basin is especially handy (foldable ones are available) for us this came on trek, it comes down to your facilities etc, but without a sink kind of thing you’re not getting very far.
  • Tights to put over boots, can be handy, I personally did not take but instead used socks… however on further reflection, tights allow you to air your boots whilst keeping ‘lil nasties’ out.
  • In sandy countries, there is sand… this sand goes EVERYWHERE. In the tents is particularly annoying so as an extra precaution a desk hoover can come in handy.
  • Especially where we were there was a distinct lack of clocks, so a watch can be handy (analogue and water proof works best).
  • Taking chap-stick, Vaseline or whatnot is a must; I had the sun cream thing that has no moisturising powers at all what so ever, so 3 weeks of nothing is rather a pain in the ass.
  • A notebook is pretty self-explanatory as you will most definitely regret not keeping a journal or notes, as I was often lazy or tired I just wrote wee bits: ‘that time we…’ ‘When we…’ and so on and so forth.
  • Keeps anti-malarials (and pill) with your crockery, so in a bag to keep all your bits together and to ensure you don’t forget to take them.
  • Pad locks are handy for keeping things safe.
  • Bottles that have clip on bits make it easier and more accessible.
  • The mini squeezy bottles of diluting juice mask the taste of chlorine tablets.
  • A home country flag comes in really handy to leave for natives as something to remember everyone by.
  • Utensils like wooden spoons, knife, grater, peelers and such like. Corner spoons never really came in of any use, except the joy of burning it for no apparent reason (but thanks to David’s mum anyway).

 

 

What not to take:

 

  • Check what season it is, as we went in the Zambian winter (but our summer). So we did not need mosquito nets because A) it was winter and there were no mosquitos around and B) there were nets already in the tents.
    So really we spent like £20 on something that wasn’t even needed.
  • We also took ‘deet’ (mosquito spray) of the 50/100 kind, however we only used the 50 as 100 either burnt your skin or melted your clothes.
  • Often you are told that collapsible cups/plates are best – which they are, however as far as mugs go, you are best just to pay the extra as cheap ones that don’t have a plastic rim just cause chaos.
  • DON’T TAKE DEAD BATTERIES. I learned this the hard way and have about 3 photos. However if this does happen and even if it does not, a good thing to do on your return home is to set up a drop box so everyone can share their photos (easy and free).
  • Don’t be stupid and take ridiculous things, like make-up or perfume of more than one razor (or a razor at all)
  • Take mini shampoo bottles and not the shampoo bars… there are put simply shite.

So if you made it to the end or read this at all, you are most likely going on an expedition. well good luck with that.

Honest it will be so worth it.

I also went to Africa and didn’t get Ebola, just saying…..

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